Moltmann on Peace

Peace is not merely the absence of war; it is also the overcoming of injustice and oppression. In positive terms, it is life that is blessed, affirmed, loved and successful–life as shalom. Anyone who wants to serve peace must serve life. He must therefore resist war, because this is the deadliest form of discord. But this resistance against war is only one part of a much wider devotion to life. The service of peace is the whole task of life.

Jürgen Moltmann, The Power of the Powerless

Real Riches

A propensity to hope and joy is real riches; one to fear and sorrow, real poverty. David Hume, Essays, Moral, Political, and Literary, Part I, Essay 18

O’Connor on Evil

What has given the South her identity are those beliefs and qualities which she has absorbed from the Scriptures and from her own history of defeat and violation: a distrust of the abstract, a sense of human dependence on the grace of God, and a knowledge that evil is not simply a problem to be solved, but a mystery to be endured.

Flannery O’Connor, “The Catholic Novelist in the Protestant South,” in Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose, eds. Robert Fitzgerald and Sally Fitzgerald (New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1969), 209.

Brueggemann on the Crisis in the Church

For I believe the crisis in the U.S. church has almost nothing to do with being liberal or conservative; it has everything to do with giving up on the faith and discipline of our Christian baptism and settling for a common, generic U.S. identity that is part patriotism, part consumerism, part violence, and part affluence.

Walter Brueggemann, A Way Other Than Our Own: Devotions for Lent

Nietzsche on Military Buildup

And perhaps the great day will come when a people, distinguished by wars and victories and by the highest development of a military order and intelligence, and accustomed to make the heaviest sacrifices for these things, will exclaim of its own free will, “We break the sword,” and will smash its entire military establishment down to its lowest foundations. Rendering oneself unarmed when one has been the best-armed, out of a height of feeling—that is the means to real peace, which must always rest on a peace of mind; whereas the so-called armed peace, as it now exists in all countries, is the absence of peace of mind. One trusts neither oneself nor one’s neighbor and, half from hatred, half from fear, does not lay down arms. Rather perish than hate and fear, and twice rather perish than make oneself hated and feared—this must some day become the highest maxim for every single commonwealth, too.

Friedrich Nietzsche, The Wanderer and His Shadow, 284.

Housman on Thought

Three minutes’ thought would suffice to find this out; but thought is irksome and three minutes is a long time.1

A. E. Housman


  1. A. E. Housman, Saturae of Juvenal (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1931), xi. [return]

The Idol of the Poll

The 11th Commandment of Election Season: thou shalt not put thy faith in polls, for they are deceptive creatures, full of empty promises and false hope.